Cutting the pockets, even with the aid of battery drills, proved quite hard. However, more work needs to be done on the platforms, but that will happen next year when the bats are not roosting.

The shelter and 'Troll' bridge had their first test over the Heritage Weekend at the beginning of September. This allowed members of the public to view the big stope and impress upon them the scale of some of the workings in the mine.

To help them grasp the size of the stope the Trust placed a manikin near the top and Pete Eggleston rigged a light to illuminate it (you switch the light on from the shelter).

Congratulations to everyone involved in this work, the end result looks very professional, well done!

Neal using the battery drill to make the timber pockets.

Above: Neal using the battery drill to make the timber pockets.
(Picture: Andy Kennelly)

The finished timbers in their new sockets.

Above: The finished timbers in their new sockets.
(Picture: Andy Kennelly)

 

Safety Platform, Perkins Level
To allow the Shropshire Mines Trust to take visitors beyond the metal bridge in Perkins / Roberts Level a certain amount of safety work was needed.

So Club members undertook the task of constructing a shelter at the base of the large stope, plus an 'ACME' bridge (Troll bridge - but don’t tell the children otherwise they won't cross it !!) across the small stope between there and the metal bridge.

To protect members of the public as they walked from the end of the metal bridge from any falling rocks it was decided to build a set of timber platforms in the stope above the end of the metal bridge.

This involved cutting pockets in the hanging and foot wall, then fitting timbers with planks on top. Rather than build one large platform, two staggered platforms have been constructed to allow bats to fly between (they have already been seen doing this!).

Looking up the stope to Andy Kennelly cutting pockets for timbers in the hanging wall.
 
Above: Looking up the stope to Andy Kennelly cutting pockets for timbers in the hanging wall.
Below: Neal Rushton measuring across the stope for timbers.
(Pictures: Andy Kennelly)

Neal Rushton measuring across the stope for timbers.